rydra_wong: Two bare feet and ankles sticking out of rolled-up jeans. (body -- barefoot)
[personal profile] rydra_wong
It's been a while, but ...

MovNat (Erwan LeCorre's lot) have started releasing free follow-along-at-home movement vids, designed to be a supplement to/preparation for outdoor MovNat practice.

Here's the first one.

It's pretty yoga-ish (not that there's anything wrong with that), but with some nice variations.

Entomophagy

Feb. 8th, 2015 03:58 pm
rydra_wong: Fingers holding down a piece of meat (heart) as it's cut with a knife, on a bright red surface. (food -- a slice of heart)
[personal profile] rydra_wong
I realize I may be doomed to turn into some sort of demi-Paleo hipster, who was into eating insects before they sold out and became all mainstream.

But I have a bag of cricket flour, and big plans for it.

Link contains recipe for Paleo "cricket fudge".
abyssinia: Sam Carter's first view of Earth from space and the words "all my dreams" (Default)
[personal profile] abyssinia
I've recently moved to Scotland, having spent the last five years living in what is one of the most food-hippie towns in the US. I've been dabbling with paleo-style eating in the US, and was learning to navigate all the various food labels (natural vs. organic, free range, grass fed, etc). I don't eat everything organic, but at least in the US there were certain foods where I tried to go organic due to a higher likelihood of pesticide retention.

So far of the two grocery places I've explored (Morrisons, and a Tesco express) I haven't seen anything labeled "organic", etc. The closest I've found to any sort of that type of labeling has been for free range eggs (and one tiny section of gluten free processed food). I also know there are different regulations on food here than in the US so some of that may not matter as much.

Does anyone have any advice or resources for learning how to navigate food labeling here? Any good sources for local/organic/etc? [I've found they have a farmers market here once a month]. Any recommended UK (or Scot) paleo style bloggers?

thanks!
rydra_wong: Half a fig with some blue cheese propped against it. (food -- fig and cheese)
[personal profile] rydra_wong
Okay, this is kind of cool.

Having said I'm British and unable to get my head round treating sweet potatoes as a sweet food in the way that US-ians seem to, of course I was immediately seized by perversity and set about trying to do just that -- and more specifically, trying to see if I could use sweet potatoes to make sweet fruit muffins without the use of any added sugar/sweeteners.

**********

300g sweet potato, peeled and cut into chunks
62.5 g coconut flour
62.5g tapioca flour (apologies for the fiddly measurements; I doubt you have to be this precise -- basically, you want 125 g of flour in total, roughly half-and-half coconut and tapioca)
1/2 tsp salt
1/2 tsp bicarbonate of soda
2 tsp coconut oil
3 large eggs
250g berries (I've been using a mixture of blueberries and blackberries, which works well, but obviously you can go with whatever you fancy)

Optional: 40g whey protein powder.

**********

Boil the sweet potatoes for 10-12 minutes (until tender to the point of a knife), then mash them with the coconut oil.

Mix all the dry ingredients together, then add the sweet potato mash and work it in (I resorted to hands rather than implements for this).

Beat the eggs and mix them in.

Stir in the berries (this is a really gorgeous moment if you're mixing blue/purple berries into bright orange batter).

Cut for photo )

I aimed to end up with some of the berries squished and mixed through the batter, some whole.

Spoon the mixture into muffin cups. This makes about nine muffins.

Bake at 185 degrees Celsius for 30 minutes.

Results: Cut for photo )

**********

Note: these are mildly sweet rather than very sweet, in a nice fruity-muffin type way.

I like them as is, but if you have a sweeter tooth, you may find you want to add a bit of sugar/honey/your sweetener of choice (maybe a sprinkle of coconut sugar on the tops of the muffins before baking would add nice crunch?).

See what you think, and let me know -- I'm curious as to how other people find them.
rydra_wong: Two bare feet and ankles sticking out of rolled-up jeans. (body -- barefoot)
[personal profile] rydra_wong
Anyone have good recipes for things to make with tapioca flour?
rydra_wong: Fingers holding down a piece of meat (heart) as it's cut with a knife, on a bright red surface. (food -- a slice of heart)
[personal profile] rydra_wong
This is a recipe in progress, but I was really pleased by this latest iteration. I've been looking for a new portable carb source for climbing sessions, and also I'm British and unable to get my head round treating sweet potatoes as a sweet food in the way that US-ians seem to.

Also, I have a bag of tapioca flour and wanted to see what I can use it for.

Ingredients:

300g sweet potato, peeled and cut into chunks
62.5 g coconut flour
62.5g tapioca flour (apologies for the fiddly measurements, as I was converting from a different type of flour; I doubt you have to be this precise -- basically, you want 125 g of flour in total, roughly half-and-half coconut and tapioca)
1/2 tsp salt
1/2 tsp bicarbonate of soda
1 tsp coconut oil (I used one infused with five spice powder, but I doubt this is essential)
1 tsp red pepper flakes
2 tsp curry powder of choice
3 large eggs

**********

Boil the sweet potatoes for 10-12 minutes (until tender to the point of a knife), then mash them with the coconut oil.

Mix all the dry ingredients together, then add the sweet potato mash and work it in (I resorted to hands rather than implements for this).

Beat the eggs and add them last.

Spoon the mixture into muffin cups (or just dollops on a sheet of tinfoil or baking parchment; it's pretty thick and holds its shape well). This makes about eight muffins.

Bake at 185 degrees for 30 minutes.

Waffles

Jun. 12th, 2013 06:29 pm
killing_rose: Raven/corvid in the frozen surf (Default)
[personal profile] killing_rose
I keep having to hit my chatlogs to figure out how I make waffles, so here's the recipe I use:

  • 4 tablespoons melted butter
  • 1/4 cup coconut flour
  • 6 eggs
  • 4 tablespoons warm honey
  • 1/4 tsp salt

Directions:

Preheat waffle iron (I always use the 2nd setting out of 5), grease generously with olive oil from the misto.

Whip 6 eggs in Kitchenaid. Add rest of ingredients. Mix all ingredients until smooth.

Pour batter onto waffle iron, and using the 1/4 cup, drop the batter to evenly distribute over the iron. Cook about 2 minutes, or until golden brown. (I have no brain; I wait until it goes green from red.) Repeat with the remaining batter.

I make about 5 waffles or so from this recipe. I also occasionally mix chocolate chips in for whichever ones of us want it. (I am not, in fact, strictly paleo, and I like chocolate.) 

rydra_wong: Two bare feet and ankles sticking out of rolled-up jeans. (body -- barefoot)
[personal profile] rydra_wong
From The Guardian:

Barefoot running shoes - reviewed

Looks like there may be some decent discussion in the comments, too.
sporky_rat: An Brown Owl from the Bunny Comic  (even more owls)
[personal profile] sporky_rat
Has anyone tried any of the recipes in Practical Paleo?
faesdeynia: (Ripped Kitty!)
[personal profile] faesdeynia
Did anyone else pick this book up? I did, because I already had a basket full of schoolbooks and got free shipping. I read it over the last week or so. Most of the reviews I had read were from other Paleo writers, so of course they raved about it; I'm not going to ignore bias that exists! However, I like to think I read it with a more skeptical eye, and found it to be a pretty good read. I especially like the phrase "food-with-no-brakes" and the explanations of how gastric hormones affect mood and emotions. I find that touchy-feely aspect is absent in other discussions about the SAD diet versus Primal/Paleo. All in all, I liked it.

I especially like how the authors understand that eating organic/grass-fed is expensive; they don't dance around the fact that high-quality ingredients are pricey. One of the biggest arguments in the paleo-sphere is, "But you'll be saving so much money by not buying processed junk, and it will be a bit more expensive, but your health is worth it." I suppose if I came from a background rich in processed foods, I might see a shift in budget, but I was alarmingly poor before becoming interested in nutrition 5 years ago. I was already buying whole chicken and using the hell out of it. A $4 chicken goes much further than a $3 box of chicken nuggets. Most of my comparisons are looking at conventional whole foods versus organic/grass-fed whole foods.

The part about health is absolutely correct, but when I got to the farmer's market, the meat I can afford is $6/pound ground - forget grass-fed steak. When we have our own house, I'm buying a big deep freeze, since I live in TX and you can get a whole, 1/2, or 1/4 butchered grass-fed cow for $6/pound. That is worth it. I won't pay $16-$20/pound for steaks, ty. The authors do give examples of where you can skimp on organic/grass-fed (drain your cooked meat well and supplement with healthy fats, for example, and fruits/veggies with skin you don't eat are okay to buy conventional).

Whole30 ahoy )

Help?

Jun. 8th, 2012 01:44 pm
killing_rose: Raven/corvid in the frozen surf (Default)
[personal profile] killing_rose
I'm gluten free, soy free, occasionally (though not always) paleo-leaning, and I just moved across the country. Because the heat has killed my appetite, I am in a major bind.

I need nutrients right now. My body's refusal to eat because it's warm is a little (a lot) ridiculous. And also, it's impacting my ability to function like a human being.

So after ex-boss mentioned it, I tried green smoothies.

I do not know what I did wrong, but I'm going to assume that it's not supposed to be. Well. Chewy.

I have texture issues. I do, in fact, feel better after having a glass full before I left the house earlier; I might even manage dried fruit soon.

But it is chewy, and that is unacceptable.

Please, god, any advice to help with with "zomg, chewy green smoothies, wtf?" and/or "It is warm, I am a displaced Alaskan, and I need nutrients like whoa."
rydra_wong: Half a fig with some blue cheese propped against it. (food -- fig and cheese)
[personal profile] rydra_wong
If you don't mind the odd pseudo-grain ...

Recipe stolen and adapted from the one here.

Ingredients:

1 cup buckwheat flour
2 tablespoons olive oil
1/2 teaspoon salt
1/4 cup water
1 handful rosemary, finely chopped
1 handful walnuts, finely chopped

Things you will also need:

baking parchment (the silicone-coated stuff, NOT waxed paper)
a rolling pin, or if you realize at the last minute that you have no rolling pin, a cylindrical bottle

Start your oven (200 degrees C).

Mix the dry ingredients together in the bowl. Then add the wet ones. Mix with a fork until it all clumps together, then knead it with your hands.

Roll it out onto the baking parchment, aiming for it to be about 1/4 inch thick. Score it into squares with a knife.

Stick it in the oven for 15-20 minutes, or until it's slightly brown on top (I went 23 minutes with this lot).

I suspect these could be even more excellent if made with garlic-infused olive oil.

X-posting to [community profile] omnomnom.
mschaos: (Default)
[personal profile] mschaos
one of my fave meals is what I call artichoke stew that I throw into a crock pot

as this is a crock pot thing, all measurements are estimates

this batch consisted of
one bag TJs pearl onions, browned in cast iron (16 oz)
2 cans diced tomato
~one jar (tj's sized) roasted pepper, diced (12 oz?)
~one can artichoke hearts - diced
4 chicken thighs
a bunch or torn up kale
~ 1 tbs thyme
juice of quarter of lemon
salt and pepper to taste

method - the only prep I do with this is to brown up the onion in a bit of butter or olive oil. toss that with everything but the kale and lemon and cook 5-7 hours on low (a bit more if the chicken is frozen)

during the last hour I add the kale. I pull the chicken out and shred it and put it back in. finish it with a bit of lemon to brighten everything up

I also use spinach in this instead of kale - but I only put it in right at the end to wilt down - otherwise it just become gray

you can go veg/vegan by taking the chicken out and sub chickpeas
rydra_wong: Fingers holding down a piece of meat (heart) as it's cut with a knife, on a bright red surface. (food -- a slice of heart)
[personal profile] rydra_wong
This is my latest culinary discovery, and is making me very happy.

The basic ingredients you need:

Definitely:

eggs (four to six)
vegetables
your fat/oil of choice
a frying pan which is fairly deep and also oven-safe

Almost certainly, though you might be able to do without:

several cloves of garlic and an onion, diced

Optionally:

pre-cooked starchy tuber (e.g. sweet potatoes)
herbs/spices
pre-cooked meat
a handful of grated cheese

I will illustrate the instructions with examples from the frittata I made today.

In your pan, saute your garlic and onions in your fat/oil of choice (in today's frittata, 1 tbsp olive oil) over a medium heat.

While that goes on, beat your eggs, together with your spices (I used 6 eggs with a half tsp of turmeric, a pinch of red chili flakes, and a metric fuckton of paprika; this requires use of the hand-cranked whisk so as not to end up with hideous paprika clots).

Turn on the grill in your oven about now so it has time to heat up (I went for around 240-50 degrees C).

Add your vegetables (red and yellow bell peppers!) to the pan and continue stirring them round occasionally for a few minutes.

Once the vegetables look about as cooked as you want them, turn the heat down to low. Add any pre-cooked tubers (sweet potatoes -- I had a whole colour theme going here) and meat (wasn't using any).

Give the whole lot a final stir, then pour your eggs over the top.

Leave the pan on the hob for about five minutes. The underside of the frittata should be cooked while the rest is still runny.

Then scatter the grated cheese on top, if you're using it (I was -- nice matured cheddar) and stick the pan under the grill for about five more minutes.

Alternatively, if -- by way of entirely hypothetical example -- you had some kind of hideous oven disaster involving the glass tray under the grill shattering and having to remove extremely hot broken glass from all over the place and then having no way to keep the pan near the grill I MEAN PURELY HYPOTHETICALLY, you can bake it, which will take a few minutes longer but work fine.

When it's done, the frittata should be solid, golden and a bit puffed up. Cut it into slices. Eat for several subsquent meals.

This is one of those recipes that actually tastes better after it's been in the fridge.
abyssinia: Jayne standing in front of his statue, words "there's just people like me" (Firefly - Jayne's no hero)
[personal profile] abyssinia
I've been reading about Primal/Paleo for a while now, and while I'm skeptical about some of the evolutionary arguments, some of the biochemical arguments are convincing and I know over the years I tend to feel better when I eat more vegetable/protein/fruit proportional to carbs/grain. I already cook the majority of my food from "real" ingredients, so it's not an overly huge leap for me, at least in terms of dropping processed food.

I've been dabbling with paleo-style meals for a while now, and I'm considering attempting to try a month of more pure paleo and see what happens. I can see giving up bread and pasta without much trouble, but I'm pretty nervous about losing cheese, yogurt, milk and beans and about battling my sweet tooth.

Anyway, Passover (in two weeks) seemed like a good time to start, since it forces me to get partway there anyway. What I'm looking for is recipe resources. Are there any paleo recipe websites you love? Cookbooks? Things which are quick and easy, or make large batches so you can enjoy leftovers? Any tricks for fighting sugar cravings? Any easy breakfast suggestions - I'm not afraid of eating non-traditional breakfast foods, but I prefer breakfast that is quick and low on dishes - my habit is a yogurt. Since I don't eat pork, I'm particularly interested in paleo recipe resources that don't put bacon in every other recipe (I do like turkey bacon, but it doesn't always work the same).
rydra_wong: Fingers holding down a piece of meat (heart) as it's cut with a knife, on a bright red surface. (food -- a slice of heart)
[personal profile] rydra_wong
By [personal profile] killing_rose, posting in [community profile] omnomnom:

Chicken and dumplings

Note: this seems to be the first recipe in the comm with the "paleo" tag. If you don't want to follow the comm, the tracking system lets you get notifications just for recipes with that tag.
rydra_wong: Two bare feet and ankles sticking out of rolled-up jeans. (body -- barefoot)
[personal profile] rydra_wong
Having just tested them in the Peak distinct, I wish to report that Vivo Barefoot's Neo Trail shoes are the business for scrambling up and down steep, muddy sheep tracks through the bracken and heather between boulders.

The deep tread makes the soles a bit stiffer than I'd normally like in a shoe (and the Vivos tend to be a bit stiff for me anyway). But compared to a regular hiking shoe they're very sensitive, the tread grips really well, and I was way, way less worried about spraining an ankle on the paths -- which is usually much more of a hazard than doing so when climbing.
faesdeynia: (I love the world)
[personal profile] faesdeynia
So far things haven't been too bad. I cook/eat most of my own food, so it's been pretty easy. I've made some recipes that have been excellent (roasted brussels sprouts with balsamic vinegar) and some that haven't turned out as well as I'd hoped (meatloaf with 1/2 cup of coconut flour in place of the 2 cups of oats I used in the past).

But I really miss dairy. I went to Central Market today and just about cried as I walked through the fine cheeses section. I love cheese SO MUCH. This is probably the longest in my whole life I've gone without yoghurt, cheese, cream, milk, or butter. I miss the mouthfeel most of all. I crave the squishy, binding feeling of melted cheese.

But, aside from that, I've been pretty good!

How is everyone else doing with their primal diet resolutions?
tassosss: (King Peter)
[personal profile] tassosss
I was pointed to this community by [personal profile] rydra_wong , who linked to a couple of my posts about trying out barefoot running.  At the moment it is socked running, but I posted another update in my journal if anyone is interested.

excursion #5, toe socks

All my barefoot running updates are under the running tag on my journal.


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