rydra_wong: Half a fig with some blue cheese propped against it. (food -- fig and cheese)
[personal profile] rydra_wong
Okay, this is kind of cool.

Having said I'm British and unable to get my head round treating sweet potatoes as a sweet food in the way that US-ians seem to, of course I was immediately seized by perversity and set about trying to do just that -- and more specifically, trying to see if I could use sweet potatoes to make sweet fruit muffins without the use of any added sugar/sweeteners.

**********

300g sweet potato, peeled and cut into chunks
62.5 g coconut flour
62.5g tapioca flour (apologies for the fiddly measurements; I doubt you have to be this precise -- basically, you want 125 g of flour in total, roughly half-and-half coconut and tapioca)
1/2 tsp salt
1/2 tsp bicarbonate of soda
2 tsp coconut oil
3 large eggs
250g berries (I've been using a mixture of blueberries and blackberries, which works well, but obviously you can go with whatever you fancy)

Optional: 40g whey protein powder.

**********

Boil the sweet potatoes for 10-12 minutes (until tender to the point of a knife), then mash them with the coconut oil.

Mix all the dry ingredients together, then add the sweet potato mash and work it in (I resorted to hands rather than implements for this).

Beat the eggs and mix them in.

Stir in the berries (this is a really gorgeous moment if you're mixing blue/purple berries into bright orange batter).

Cut for photo )

I aimed to end up with some of the berries squished and mixed through the batter, some whole.

Spoon the mixture into muffin cups. This makes about nine muffins.

Bake at 185 degrees Celsius for 30 minutes.

Results: Cut for photo )

**********

Note: these are mildly sweet rather than very sweet, in a nice fruity-muffin type way.

I like them as is, but if you have a sweeter tooth, you may find you want to add a bit of sugar/honey/your sweetener of choice (maybe a sprinkle of coconut sugar on the tops of the muffins before baking would add nice crunch?).

See what you think, and let me know -- I'm curious as to how other people find them.
rydra_wong: Two bare feet and ankles sticking out of rolled-up jeans. (body -- barefoot)
[personal profile] rydra_wong
Anyone have good recipes for things to make with tapioca flour?
rydra_wong: Fingers holding down a piece of meat (heart) as it's cut with a knife, on a bright red surface. (food -- a slice of heart)
[personal profile] rydra_wong
This is a recipe in progress, but I was really pleased by this latest iteration. I've been looking for a new portable carb source for climbing sessions, and also I'm British and unable to get my head round treating sweet potatoes as a sweet food in the way that US-ians seem to.

Also, I have a bag of tapioca flour and wanted to see what I can use it for.

Ingredients:

300g sweet potato, peeled and cut into chunks
62.5 g coconut flour
62.5g tapioca flour (apologies for the fiddly measurements, as I was converting from a different type of flour; I doubt you have to be this precise -- basically, you want 125 g of flour in total, roughly half-and-half coconut and tapioca)
1/2 tsp salt
1/2 tsp bicarbonate of soda
1 tsp coconut oil (I used one infused with five spice powder, but I doubt this is essential)
1 tsp red pepper flakes
2 tsp curry powder of choice
3 large eggs

**********

Boil the sweet potatoes for 10-12 minutes (until tender to the point of a knife), then mash them with the coconut oil.

Mix all the dry ingredients together, then add the sweet potato mash and work it in (I resorted to hands rather than implements for this).

Beat the eggs and add them last.

Spoon the mixture into muffin cups (or just dollops on a sheet of tinfoil or baking parchment; it's pretty thick and holds its shape well). This makes about eight muffins.

Bake at 185 degrees for 30 minutes.

Waffles

Jun. 12th, 2013 06:29 pm
killing_rose: Raven/corvid in the frozen surf (Default)
[personal profile] killing_rose
I keep having to hit my chatlogs to figure out how I make waffles, so here's the recipe I use:

  • 4 tablespoons melted butter
  • 1/4 cup coconut flour
  • 6 eggs
  • 4 tablespoons warm honey
  • 1/4 tsp salt

Directions:

Preheat waffle iron (I always use the 2nd setting out of 5), grease generously with olive oil from the misto.

Whip 6 eggs in Kitchenaid. Add rest of ingredients. Mix all ingredients until smooth.

Pour batter onto waffle iron, and using the 1/4 cup, drop the batter to evenly distribute over the iron. Cook about 2 minutes, or until golden brown. (I have no brain; I wait until it goes green from red.) Repeat with the remaining batter.

I make about 5 waffles or so from this recipe. I also occasionally mix chocolate chips in for whichever ones of us want it. (I am not, in fact, strictly paleo, and I like chocolate.) 

rydra_wong: Half a fig with some blue cheese propped against it. (food -- fig and cheese)
[personal profile] rydra_wong
If you don't mind the odd pseudo-grain ...

Recipe stolen and adapted from the one here.

Ingredients:

1 cup buckwheat flour
2 tablespoons olive oil
1/2 teaspoon salt
1/4 cup water
1 handful rosemary, finely chopped
1 handful walnuts, finely chopped

Things you will also need:

baking parchment (the silicone-coated stuff, NOT waxed paper)
a rolling pin, or if you realize at the last minute that you have no rolling pin, a cylindrical bottle

Start your oven (200 degrees C).

Mix the dry ingredients together in the bowl. Then add the wet ones. Mix with a fork until it all clumps together, then knead it with your hands.

Roll it out onto the baking parchment, aiming for it to be about 1/4 inch thick. Score it into squares with a knife.

Stick it in the oven for 15-20 minutes, or until it's slightly brown on top (I went 23 minutes with this lot).

I suspect these could be even more excellent if made with garlic-infused olive oil.

X-posting to [community profile] omnomnom.
axelrod: (Default)
[personal profile] axelrod
Hi, all!

I'm on the look out for a good, uncomplicated buckwheat bread recipe. I'm concerned that buckwheat bread can get dry - I'm picky about textures, and dislike foods that are too dry generally. I figure adding fruit would help - like, a couple baked pears or something.

I've found a couple promising recipes for kasha (buckwheat porridge) but I'm definitely interested in any suggestions or tips you all might have. I've never cooked buckwheat before! 
axelrod: (Default)
[personal profile] axelrod
1) If you're looking for an alternative to wheat flour, you might consider acorns. Pro: nice nutty flavor, fairly nutritious, if ground finely makes a delicious bread (there's a couple variations here), high in omega 6. Con: work intensive to make (you have to leech tanins out of most varieties) and difficult to source prepared acorn flour, not ideal if you need a diet lower in fat.

2) Has anyone made buckwheat bread? Buckwheat porridge? I really like buckwheat soba noodles, though everywhere I've found them so far they're pretty expensive. Any other suggestions for how to prepare buckwheat? 

3) The book on paleo diets I requested from the library still isn't available, so a basic question: how do people on the paleo diet get enough complex carbs, or is that not really a concern?

4) Cattails seem to be paleo-friendly. You can eat the root, spikes, corms, pollen (which apparently can be used like flour), and seeds. Apparently cattails get incredible yields. There's info here, but I haven't done any research besides (so far). Cattails grow wild in many regions - the concern there is whether there's anything toxic in the soil or water, so if there isn't lots of plant and animal life in the body of water it's growing in or near, you probably shouldn't eat it. Also, there are near-relatives which appear similar to cattails but which are poisonous. The article I link to above tells you what they are and how to identify them, as well as the various parts of teh plant that are edible at different times of year and some suggestions for preparation.

5) Related to #2, what kinds of bread are paleo-friendly? Specifically, I want to make sandwiches and toast.

crackers!

Sep. 15th, 2010 07:31 pm
mschaos: (Default)
[personal profile] mschaos
so I working on eating clean and unprocessed foods...no grains, no sugars (other than a bit of honey)

but I have been missing the crunch...actually the 'crispy' factor...ya know...a tasty savory cracker with cheese...but most crackers are made with wheat, rye, etc

so I went looking around and found a couple recipes that looked interesting and I cobbled together a mixture of almond meal (about a cup), ground flax (about a third a cup), quinoa (about a third a cup) and sesame seeds (about a half a cup)...while I know quinoa is not really classified as paleo, but it is a technically a seed so I added a bit for some crunch

added a couple tablespoons of olive oil, granulated garlic, dried onion and salt and half a tbs of baking soda and blitzed it in the food processor. added a bit of water to bind it all

then rolled it out between 2 pieces or parchment paper and baked at 350 until crispy

they are AWESOME

the only thing is I will use less salt next time (the recipe I had said a tbs, I will use half that)

it took all of 10 minutes to prep and 15 to bake so not too shabby...next time I will make a bit more, then divide and bake on 2 pans for a thinner cracker

now the trick is to not eat them ALL

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