Entomophagy

Feb. 8th, 2015 03:58 pm
rydra_wong: Fingers holding down a piece of meat (heart) as it's cut with a knife, on a bright red surface. (food -- a slice of heart)
[personal profile] rydra_wong
I realize I may be doomed to turn into some sort of demi-Paleo hipster, who was into eating insects before they sold out and became all mainstream.

But I have a bag of cricket flour, and big plans for it.

Link contains recipe for Paleo "cricket fudge".
rydra_wong: Half a fig with some blue cheese propped against it. (food -- fig and cheese)
[personal profile] rydra_wong
Okay, this is kind of cool.

Having said I'm British and unable to get my head round treating sweet potatoes as a sweet food in the way that US-ians seem to, of course I was immediately seized by perversity and set about trying to do just that -- and more specifically, trying to see if I could use sweet potatoes to make sweet fruit muffins without the use of any added sugar/sweeteners.

**********

300g sweet potato, peeled and cut into chunks
62.5 g coconut flour
62.5g tapioca flour (apologies for the fiddly measurements; I doubt you have to be this precise -- basically, you want 125 g of flour in total, roughly half-and-half coconut and tapioca)
1/2 tsp salt
1/2 tsp bicarbonate of soda
2 tsp coconut oil
3 large eggs
250g berries (I've been using a mixture of blueberries and blackberries, which works well, but obviously you can go with whatever you fancy)

Optional: 40g whey protein powder.

**********

Boil the sweet potatoes for 10-12 minutes (until tender to the point of a knife), then mash them with the coconut oil.

Mix all the dry ingredients together, then add the sweet potato mash and work it in (I resorted to hands rather than implements for this).

Beat the eggs and mix them in.

Stir in the berries (this is a really gorgeous moment if you're mixing blue/purple berries into bright orange batter).

Cut for photo )

I aimed to end up with some of the berries squished and mixed through the batter, some whole.

Spoon the mixture into muffin cups. This makes about nine muffins.

Bake at 185 degrees Celsius for 30 minutes.

Results: Cut for photo )

**********

Note: these are mildly sweet rather than very sweet, in a nice fruity-muffin type way.

I like them as is, but if you have a sweeter tooth, you may find you want to add a bit of sugar/honey/your sweetener of choice (maybe a sprinkle of coconut sugar on the tops of the muffins before baking would add nice crunch?).

See what you think, and let me know -- I'm curious as to how other people find them.
rydra_wong: Fingers holding down a piece of meat (heart) as it's cut with a knife, on a bright red surface. (food -- a slice of heart)
[personal profile] rydra_wong
This is a recipe in progress, but I was really pleased by this latest iteration. I've been looking for a new portable carb source for climbing sessions, and also I'm British and unable to get my head round treating sweet potatoes as a sweet food in the way that US-ians seem to.

Also, I have a bag of tapioca flour and wanted to see what I can use it for.

Ingredients:

300g sweet potato, peeled and cut into chunks
62.5 g coconut flour
62.5g tapioca flour (apologies for the fiddly measurements, as I was converting from a different type of flour; I doubt you have to be this precise -- basically, you want 125 g of flour in total, roughly half-and-half coconut and tapioca)
1/2 tsp salt
1/2 tsp bicarbonate of soda
1 tsp coconut oil (I used one infused with five spice powder, but I doubt this is essential)
1 tsp red pepper flakes
2 tsp curry powder of choice
3 large eggs

**********

Boil the sweet potatoes for 10-12 minutes (until tender to the point of a knife), then mash them with the coconut oil.

Mix all the dry ingredients together, then add the sweet potato mash and work it in (I resorted to hands rather than implements for this).

Beat the eggs and add them last.

Spoon the mixture into muffin cups (or just dollops on a sheet of tinfoil or baking parchment; it's pretty thick and holds its shape well). This makes about eight muffins.

Bake at 185 degrees for 30 minutes.

Waffles

Jun. 12th, 2013 06:29 pm
killing_rose: Raven/corvid in the frozen surf (Default)
[personal profile] killing_rose
I keep having to hit my chatlogs to figure out how I make waffles, so here's the recipe I use:

  • 4 tablespoons melted butter
  • 1/4 cup coconut flour
  • 6 eggs
  • 4 tablespoons warm honey
  • 1/4 tsp salt

Directions:

Preheat waffle iron (I always use the 2nd setting out of 5), grease generously with olive oil from the misto.

Whip 6 eggs in Kitchenaid. Add rest of ingredients. Mix all ingredients until smooth.

Pour batter onto waffle iron, and using the 1/4 cup, drop the batter to evenly distribute over the iron. Cook about 2 minutes, or until golden brown. (I have no brain; I wait until it goes green from red.) Repeat with the remaining batter.

I make about 5 waffles or so from this recipe. I also occasionally mix chocolate chips in for whichever ones of us want it. (I am not, in fact, strictly paleo, and I like chocolate.) 

sporky_rat: An Brown Owl from the Bunny Comic  (even more owls)
[personal profile] sporky_rat
Has anyone tried any of the recipes in Practical Paleo?
rydra_wong: Half a fig with some blue cheese propped against it. (food -- fig and cheese)
[personal profile] rydra_wong
If you don't mind the odd pseudo-grain ...

Recipe stolen and adapted from the one here.

Ingredients:

1 cup buckwheat flour
2 tablespoons olive oil
1/2 teaspoon salt
1/4 cup water
1 handful rosemary, finely chopped
1 handful walnuts, finely chopped

Things you will also need:

baking parchment (the silicone-coated stuff, NOT waxed paper)
a rolling pin, or if you realize at the last minute that you have no rolling pin, a cylindrical bottle

Start your oven (200 degrees C).

Mix the dry ingredients together in the bowl. Then add the wet ones. Mix with a fork until it all clumps together, then knead it with your hands.

Roll it out onto the baking parchment, aiming for it to be about 1/4 inch thick. Score it into squares with a knife.

Stick it in the oven for 15-20 minutes, or until it's slightly brown on top (I went 23 minutes with this lot).

I suspect these could be even more excellent if made with garlic-infused olive oil.

X-posting to [community profile] omnomnom.
mschaos: (Default)
[personal profile] mschaos
one of my fave meals is what I call artichoke stew that I throw into a crock pot

as this is a crock pot thing, all measurements are estimates

this batch consisted of
one bag TJs pearl onions, browned in cast iron (16 oz)
2 cans diced tomato
~one jar (tj's sized) roasted pepper, diced (12 oz?)
~one can artichoke hearts - diced
4 chicken thighs
a bunch or torn up kale
~ 1 tbs thyme
juice of quarter of lemon
salt and pepper to taste

method - the only prep I do with this is to brown up the onion in a bit of butter or olive oil. toss that with everything but the kale and lemon and cook 5-7 hours on low (a bit more if the chicken is frozen)

during the last hour I add the kale. I pull the chicken out and shred it and put it back in. finish it with a bit of lemon to brighten everything up

I also use spinach in this instead of kale - but I only put it in right at the end to wilt down - otherwise it just become gray

you can go veg/vegan by taking the chicken out and sub chickpeas
rydra_wong: Fingers holding down a piece of meat (heart) as it's cut with a knife, on a bright red surface. (food -- a slice of heart)
[personal profile] rydra_wong
This is my latest culinary discovery, and is making me very happy.

The basic ingredients you need:

Definitely:

eggs (four to six)
vegetables
your fat/oil of choice
a frying pan which is fairly deep and also oven-safe

Almost certainly, though you might be able to do without:

several cloves of garlic and an onion, diced

Optionally:

pre-cooked starchy tuber (e.g. sweet potatoes)
herbs/spices
pre-cooked meat
a handful of grated cheese

I will illustrate the instructions with examples from the frittata I made today.

In your pan, saute your garlic and onions in your fat/oil of choice (in today's frittata, 1 tbsp olive oil) over a medium heat.

While that goes on, beat your eggs, together with your spices (I used 6 eggs with a half tsp of turmeric, a pinch of red chili flakes, and a metric fuckton of paprika; this requires use of the hand-cranked whisk so as not to end up with hideous paprika clots).

Turn on the grill in your oven about now so it has time to heat up (I went for around 240-50 degrees C).

Add your vegetables (red and yellow bell peppers!) to the pan and continue stirring them round occasionally for a few minutes.

Once the vegetables look about as cooked as you want them, turn the heat down to low. Add any pre-cooked tubers (sweet potatoes -- I had a whole colour theme going here) and meat (wasn't using any).

Give the whole lot a final stir, then pour your eggs over the top.

Leave the pan on the hob for about five minutes. The underside of the frittata should be cooked while the rest is still runny.

Then scatter the grated cheese on top, if you're using it (I was -- nice matured cheddar) and stick the pan under the grill for about five more minutes.

Alternatively, if -- by way of entirely hypothetical example -- you had some kind of hideous oven disaster involving the glass tray under the grill shattering and having to remove extremely hot broken glass from all over the place and then having no way to keep the pan near the grill I MEAN PURELY HYPOTHETICALLY, you can bake it, which will take a few minutes longer but work fine.

When it's done, the frittata should be solid, golden and a bit puffed up. Cut it into slices. Eat for several subsquent meals.

This is one of those recipes that actually tastes better after it's been in the fridge.
rydra_wong: Fingers holding down a piece of meat (heart) as it's cut with a knife, on a bright red surface. (food -- a slice of heart)
[personal profile] rydra_wong
By [personal profile] killing_rose, posting in [community profile] omnomnom:

Chicken and dumplings

Note: this seems to be the first recipe in the comm with the "paleo" tag. If you don't want to follow the comm, the tracking system lets you get notifications just for recipes with that tag.
0jack: Closeup of Boba Fett's helmet, angular orange stripe surrounding a narrow window on a greenish metallic field. (Bhel.)
[personal profile] 0jack
Does anyone have suggestions for preparing organ meats?  I love liver... lightly breaded and fried in butter with onions. <.<;;; *cough* 

While I'm happy to assign that into my 20% bucket, I'd rather find some new ways to prepare organ meats.  So y'all know, I will never eat tripe unless it's deep fried... preferably with some hot sauce for dipping.  I am too sensitive for kidneys.  

So, liver and heart?  I really do like liver when I'm low on iron.  I'd actually eat it raw if I could get it fresh and safe, but I'd eat any meat raw if I could get it fresh and safe.  I just ate a huge plate of it cooked, but as I said, soaked in milk and then dredged in starches.  I could try coconut flour?  What else?

The dogs are all for me eating more organ meats because they get the trimmed bits. *g*  
faesdeynia: (Default)
[personal profile] faesdeynia
I made this the other day, and it's been fabulous. It's been a great accompaniment to my breakfast.

recipe in here )
rydra_wong: Close-up of the moulded design on a bar of Grenada Chocolate Company chocolate. (food -- grenada chocolate)
[personal profile] rydra_wong
If you made these with honey instead of sugar, I believe they'd be technically paleo (and the original Greek yoghurt version would be primal):

Link to recipe in my DW.

Still a sweet treat food, of course, but it's nice to be able to make your own from quality ingredients.
rydra_wong: Fingers holding down a piece of meat (heart) as it's cut with a knife, on a bright red surface. (food -- a slice of heart)
[personal profile] rydra_wong
I gather that whether or not you can buy wild game depends very much on your location. But if you have the option, it's definitely worth investigating it.

It tends to be preferable to farmed meat from a health perspective, and there are sometimes benefits from an animal welfare perspective: some of it is from populations that need to be culled in order to survive, and I like the idea that an animal I'm eating has had the chance to have a natural and interesting life in the wild before its death.

Ingredients (per person, all approximate):

250g wild pigeon breasts
about 50g salad leaves (sharp tastes are good here -- think rocket/arugula, mizuna, or mustard-y leaves)
a handful of blueberries
a handful of chopped walnuts
maybe a pear, cored and sliced
2 tsp balsamic vinegar
walnut oil if you have it
olive oil

Throw the leaves, nuts and fruit into a bowl (or onto a plate). If you have walnut oil on hand, it's nice to drizzle a bit over the top, but the recipe will work fine without it.

Cut the pigeon breasts into bite-sized chunks. Grease a frying pan with a bit of olive oil (or your oil/fat of choice) and saute them quickly, then tip them on top of the salad.

Finally, pour over a tsp or two of balsamic vinegar, to taste.
rydra_wong: Fingers holding down a piece of meat (heart) as it's cut with a knife, on a bright red surface. (food -- a slice of heart)
[personal profile] rydra_wong
Ingredients:

250 crab claws (prepared)
bunch pak choi
small red pepper
optional onion (about half a small onion?)
2-3 teaspoons coconut oil (or cooking oil/fat of your choice)
teaspoon curry powder of your choice
1 lump of ginger, 3 cloves of garlic (a small chili pepper might not go amiss either, depending on your preferences and the heat of your curry powder)

Peel the ginger and mince it and the garlic and optional chili. Slice the pak choi, pepper, and optional onion.

Heat a wok to cooking heat (the rule of thumb I learned was that the right heat has been reached when a drop of water flicked onto the surface of the wok will "dance").

Add the coconut oil, then, as soon as it's melted, the crab claws, ginger, garlic and curry powder (and optional chili). Stir.

After the crab claws have been cooking for 3-4 minutes, add the vegetables, keep stirring, and cook for a couple more minutes.

Note: chopsticks are very useful for extracting the bits of meat at the tip of the claws from inside the shell.
rydra_wong: Lee Miller photo showing two women wearing metal fire masks in England during WWII. (Default)
[personal profile] rydra_wong
My latest culinary experiment (inspired by ideas stolen from all over the place); I am extremely pleased with how it turned out.

Take your frozen banana (it's quite possible you could use a non-frozen banana; I just haven't tried it that way).

Blend with 200ml (about half a can) of coconut milk and a tablespoon or so of high-quality unsweetened cocoa powder.

Freeze in an icecream maker.

I should note that I don't have an icecream maker, and did it the old-school way by breaking up the crystals every 30 minutes, but I think you'd get a much creamier texture with a proper icecream maker.

Paleo, vegan, GFCF, sugar-free, seriously delicious.
rydra_wong: 19th-C strongwoman and trapeze artist Charmion flexes her biceps while wearing a marvellous feathery hat (strength -- strongwoman)
[personal profile] rydra_wong
Thought I'd link a couple of paleo-compatible recipes I previously posted elsewhere:

Ridiculously easy poached salmon
Banana not-icecream

They're both very low-spoons.
rydra_wong: A woman boulderer lunges up towards the camera for a hold. (climbing -- puccio!!!)
[personal profile] rydra_wong
Okay, this is basically fancied-up scrambled eggs, but it's fun, pretty low-spoons, and is the first thing I've tried using coconut oil for.

For one person:

teaspoon of coconut oil
three eggs
some mild-ish curry powder
handful of dried coconut chips

Beat your eggs together, adding a sprinkling of your curry powder of choice (I have a "coconut curry" spice mix, which is what inspired this in the first place, but I imagine various kinds would work).

Melt your coconut oil in a pan, then tip in your eggs and scramble as per usual. Once they're done, mix in the coconut chips and eat.
muck_a_luck: (Outer Banks)
[personal profile] muck_a_luck
I just linked this in the other discussion, but thought maybe I should post it as a useful looking resource:

http://paleofood.com/
rydra_wong: A woman boulderer lunges up towards the camera for a hold. (climbing -- puccio!!!)
[personal profile] rydra_wong
You can make the salad and the paprika chicken livers separately, but IMHO the combination is Win.

This is a good dish for people who want to try offal but are nervous about it: the paprika and the crunchy clean-tasting salad cut some of the heavy taste and richness that offal can have.

Salad base:

broccoli (boiled for 2-3 minutes max -- you want it bright green and crunchy)
raw red cabbage, thinly sliced
raw red onions, thinly sliced
avocado
bell peppers of any colour, sliced into strips
walnuts

Vary the quantities and add or subtract ingredients as you feel inclined. This is a sturdy salad and once made will last nicely in the fridge, so you can make it well in advance. You could add a little balsamic vinegar if you fancied it.

Paprika chicken livers:

Take the livers and chop into bite-sized pieces.

In a bowl, put a small amount of your oil/fat of choice (olive oil, canola, ghee, whatever). Then add way, way more paprika than you think you need and mix until you end up with something thick, red, and paint-like.

Add the livers and turn until they're thoroughly coated.

Then tip them into a hot pan and saute very quickly -- literally a minute or two -- before tossing them over the salad.
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